RoseFile Database

moschata - Species Rambler Rose

R. moschata

Species Rambler. Bred by Nature in Western Asia in Antiquity.
Use:
 
Pillar, Arch, Wall
Color:
 
White
Form:
 
Single
Fragrance:
 
Strong
Remontance:
 
None
Abundance:
 
Moderate
Bloom Size:
 
Small (1-2 in)
Cold Hardiness:
 
Zone 7 - 9
Height & Width:
 
12 ft x
Recommendation:
 
Highly Recommended

Comments Rosa moschata is a wild rose species that produces five-petalled white flowers in great profusion. It is reputed to produce a rich and delicious scent for which Bishop Pemberton named his roses - although the hereditary connection was remote. Rosa moschata can be trained as a climber or as a shrub. The rose evolved in the Himalayan mountains of Asia and was being imported to the Mediterranean regions by the sixteenth century. An entry at HMF suggests that the native form still found in the Chinese Himalayas is superior to the forms collected in the mideast for their shorter shoots, larger flowers, and darker foliage.

BTW: Some rosarians assert nostalgically that Rosa brunonii has usurped its place, that brunonii's musk fragrance is inferior to moschata's, and that our olfactory senses are the worse off for it. Perhaps it is so; but that's a problem about which little can be done, if it is true. In the mean time we might spend our efforts choosing roses for our gardens that have delicious fragrance where we can.